Sure You Can Test, But Can You Really Test?

Good day my fellow readers!

As I have been learning all about software testing in class, the career of software tester has looked more and more like a job I would like to do. In my readings, I can across a blog post titled, “10 Qualities That Can Make You A  Good Tester.” I know hat you are thinking, “Ugh! Clickbait list articles.” but this one seemed relevant so I decided to have a read anyway.

The post starts off asking the question, ” What makes you think you are good at testing? Why do you qualify as a tester?” The author was saying that anyone with enough knowledge can test a program. It falls to different qualities of the tester that truly make them a good tester.

The first quality is that the tester understands priorities. What should be tested, what should be automated, what requires manual testing, what should be done first, ect. You are given a thing(s) to test and you have a limited amount of time to test them. Prioritization is a must.

Next, the tester should ask questions. The questions go farther than just, “What is my goal?” They must deeper like what changed, what was fixed, what is the product used for, or who will use it. The more understanding a tester has, the better they can do their testing.

The tester must be able to create a number of ideas. There isn’t just one way to test one thing and one product may be used in different ways. Simply put, more ideas = better testing.

The tester must be able to analyze data. Not knowing what data you get back means you are missing a big part of your testing as much of automated testing is reading and understanding data.

The tester must be able to report negative things in a positive light and be good at reporting. These are technically two points but they are practically the same thing. Reporting something in a positive way, even if negative, is a great way to build solid communication and improve teamwork. This plays into good reporting. People want to hear straight and to the point reports that get the point across and all the important parts. No one wants to sit there and read a list of negatives for minutes on end.

A tester must be able to support the developer. This goes beyond just finding a bug for example. A developer can’t fix a bug if they are having a hard time even recreating it.

The tester can co-relate real-time scenarios to testing. This sounds like a lot but it really boils down to A.B.T. Always Be Testing. Almost like improve testing. If you constantly test thing in your life outside the office, it can give you ideas to test things inside the office.

A tester must be a constant learner. Like the rest of the programming industry, nothing stands still and you shouldn’t either. Learn new technology, new tools, and new ideas.

The last trait is the tester must be able to wear the end user’s shoes. The ultimate goal of the product is to send it to the end user. If the tester can’t understand the end user, the end user will most likely not be happy with what they get.

One big thing stands out to me after reading this list… the end user is everything. In just about every article I have read the end user will without a doubt make an appearance in one way or another. If I can’t get my head around what the end user wants, I will not last long as a tester. The co-relate real -time scenarios was an interesting one as I like most, probably leave work at the office and never take it home. This takes work and home and fuses them keeping the skill of idea generation at the forefront. What surprised me a bit was that the reporting skills were geared toward streamlined and quick reports. I had expected reports in the testing world to be longer and more technical. This may just be the writer’s individual experience but it does make sense to me. The people testers report to literally made the thing they tested. They probably don’t need a nitty-gritty teardown.

Now I have some things to work on as a programmer before I graduate. They don’t seem hard thankfully, just something that requires a lot of time.

Until next time readers, have a good day!

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