Uh Oh! Spaghetti Code!

Hello, once again my fellow readers! I am sorry to report that this will be my last blog post for this semester and in turn this class. Continuing with my trend of Antipatterns today I will talk about a delicious Antipattern, Spaghetti Code.

SPaghetti code is the Antipattern that everyone first falls into when learning how to code a new language, learning a new coding tool, or learning how to code in general. Spaghetti code is the Antipattern representing code that has very little software structure. As a result, this leaves the code with a lack of clarity or direction, even to the original developer. This is the classic moment where you uncover code from some time ago, sit down, look at it, and go, “What was I even trying to do here?”

It can be quite easy to identify Spaghetti Code. Simply look for methods being very process oriented. Object implementation will also dictate flox execution. You will see minimal relationships between objects. You will see a very predictable pattern of object use.

Spaghetti Code can result in many consequences. Spaghetti code results in a program with diminishing returns. If Spaghetti code is mined, only part of the code will even be suitable for reusable if any of the code is reusable at all. As well, maintaining the code will result in being much more wasteful and a diminishing return as well. It will be more practical and less wasteful if a new solution is developed. Spaghetti code is so detrimental, it can even remove the benefits of object-oriented design.

To fix Spaghetti Code, you can refactor your code. Refactoring code is a natural and excellent way to maintain your code and is a wonderful way to increase performance. Code refactoring first must achieve a sufficient structure. Then, performance critical code must be identified and then structure compromises must be implemented as to enhance performance. Of course, the best way to get rid of Spaghetti Code is to prevent it in the first place.

As I was reading this, I knew that this is something that I could apply this almost immediately. In my next semester, I will have to work in a team and build off of an existing program. This Antipattern will stay with me and I definitely will see how I can work refactoring into the process to ensure that no Spaghetti code will remain. I have a sneaking suspicion that refactoring will be an idea that if implemented, will be able to squash many different Antipatterns that show up or are already lurking.

Well folks, this going to be my last blog entry for this semester. Thanks for reading and learning along with me (or watching me read). Until next time, have a wonderful day!

 

I Know Halloween Was A Couple Months Ago But…

Hello, again my friendly neighboorhood readers!

This week I have been again been reading up on those crazy Antipatterns I discovered week. As you can probably tell by the title, the Antipattern I am writing about this week is a Halloween themed Antipattern. I know it’s a little late but today’s Antipattern is the Poltergeist.

A Poltergeist is a class that has a limited role to play or limited responsibilities in a system. This practice adds unnecessary abstraction and their short life cycle means more wasted resources. Poltergeists normally appear to initiate some other action of a class that has a more permanent status. A Poltergeist is easily identifiable as they will typically bear the “_manager” or “_controller” title in their name. The main three disastrous effects of the Poltergeist Antipattern is a waste of resources every time they are called, they utilize redundant navigation paths, and the clutter the object model, getting in the way of proper object-oriented design. If a Poltergeist Antipattern is left alone it can result in such occurrences as transient associations, stateless classes, redundant navigation paths, short duration, temporary classes, and objects, and single operation classes. Some typical causes that lead to a Poltergeist Antipattern manifesting are a lack of object-oriented architecture, using the incorrect tool for the job, and of course, a specific disaster such as management incompetence.

Now how do we fix this Poltergeist problem? Well, they gotta go. Of course, once the Poltergeists are gone, the functionality they had must be replaced with an adjustment to the architecture. Another solution is to utilize the 80% solution that we discussed in the post discussing the Blob Antipattern.

Now, I do not know about you reader, but I believe that this is definitely an Antipattern that every programmer falls prey too, especially when they are beginning. I can think of many programs that I have many over the years that have had at least one Poltergeist stalking around in them. This does make me rethink how I will program in the future. While the programs I may write now do not need any real optimization, in the future, optimization is going to be a required skill for me.

Well, that is it for today readers. Have a good week until next time!